Category Archives: Herbs

Considerations for Wildcrafing Herbal Medicines

Written by Katolen Yardley, MNIMH, RH (AHG)

Wild harvesting and a return to “foraging skills” has become very popular in recent times- essential it is recognizing the bounty of plants that mother earth provides. On one hand, it is fabulous that more people are learning skills in plant recognition and able to harvest the medicine they need, when they need it – plant medicine is essentially medicine for the people; supplied by mother earth.

      

Wild crafting is very cost effective (there is no markup on the product) and one has complete control over the quality of the medicine; knowing about all processes from start to finish. Perhaps wild crafting can raise awareness of the importance of caring for the earth – it is an ideal practice for those who have an interest in “getting back to the land”; If one spends time in nature, and harvests her yields, individuals may be more likely to care for the earth, recognizing that what we do to the earth, we do to ourselves. Pollution, clear cutting and the use of pesticides all impact the quality of our food and affect our health. Many people are disconnected from their food source and medicines;  we cannot  have high quality food if the soil the food is grown on is contaminated.

   

Here are some important considerations if one wants to begin wild crafting – many of which should be thought through prior to visiting the land and gathering the plants.

Wild crafting can be defined as a return to mother nature to gather the plant medicine which she herself provides. Plants should be harvested with care for the plant and concern the environment (plant sustainability, the ecosystem around and quality of the soil). Wild crafters return to the land to harvest their herbs, barks and roots- walking through undisturbed forests, meadows or hills. Ethical wild crafting is now an important consideration which ensures care for the environment, all of its inhabitants and the future supply of a plant.

     

Plants should always be harvested away from pollutants including: toxic rain pollution and soil which has been contaminated with pesticides or herbicides and ground run off . Take time to consider what is “up the hill from a harvest” as animal waste, toxic runoff flows down a hill to setting in and contaminate soil away from the original site of contamination.

Investigate the history of the land. Old train tracks, mining sites and garbage dumping sites are often the sites of soil contamination even decades after visible contamination has been removed. Harvests should be far from car fumes (carbon monoxide), gas fumes as well as animal waste. Do not harvest from designated parkland or private property.

Whenever possible read up and educate oneself about how to harvest a plant part without killing the plant. Sometimes this is not possible – as in the case of wild cherry bark for example – harvesting a lot of the bark can kill the entire tree. So instead consider venturing out after a wind storm and select the boughs that mother nature has herself discarded for your harvest.

If you are harvesting the aerial plant parts, Do not pull this plant out from its roots  instead have proper equipment, pruning shears to neatly clip some aerial parts-remember to leave enough of any one plant for it to go to seed or continuing sprouting through the growing season or the next year.

    

Do not take the first or the last plant – never ever overharvest. Plants need to be able to go to seed and also sustain other life of animals grazing on local nutritive plants for food. Pay attention to what is around the plant. Are bees flocking to this plant to assist with pollination? Many edible plants are also food for bears or deer. Some species grow on other plants – and disturbing their ecosystem may kill more than 1 plant.

Take only what you need– any typically this is far less than what our mind thinks.

Do no harm. Be aware of the environment one is harvesting from- the plant you are using for medicine has a home and is a part of other plant communities; animals and insects may depend on this plant for survival, nutrient uptake, and essential symbiotic relationships. Recognise that you are disturbing this delicate ecosystem. Take only what you need -less than 10 % of a plant grove, preferably in the middle of the grove; so not the first plant you find and certainly not the last one in the grove and leave NO TRACE that you were ever there.

Proper plant identification is essential- especially for some of those plant families containing toxic look alikes which are easily confused with a benign non toxic plant. Have 2-3 excellent plant identification references- preferable with photos to ensure that no mistaken identities occur. Become familiar with local green medicines (often common weeds)- they are numerous!

Do not harvest endangered or at risk herbs from nature, instead take the time and attempt to grow your own herbs- Growing plants on your own land- get creative- (a window sill or even community garden will suffice) and will  raise your respect for the delicate plants which are fighting in nature to survive both the elements of nature and enthusiastic harvesters. Some plants take 10-12 years to regrow – this is not sustainable. Chaga for example is a very popular medicinal mushroom which selectively grows on birch trees, it takes years to grow and harvesting the mushroom can often kill the tree it is grown on. Again not ideal – this is an example of an herb/ mushroom which is best purchased from a supplier who grown the mushrooms in grow labs.

    

Quality and processing of herbs: have the herb leaves been munched by other plant enthusiasts – insects? Is the plant part to use too young to harvest- in which leave it in the ground for another season. Young stalks, fresh vibrant green leaves contain the most vital medicine. Ensure you use the seasons to determine when to harvest certain plant parts. Roots, rhizomes are best harvested when the vital force is highest in the root – the fall and winter is this time. Leaves and aerial plant parts can be harvested through the spring and summer- however older or brown leaves are not vibrant. Is the herb too old?  – then leave it as an elder in the plant grove.

Gathering the plants is one consideration however processing and drying procedures are also a consideration. Many plants oxidize poorly when drying, and prefer to have lots of room to dry without coming into contact with other plant leaves. Other herbs stalks can be bound together and hung in a drying room with good air circulation. A dehydrator or drying rack can assist. Color should be vibrant, with a characteristic scent of the plant. Store plants in glass container and dried herbs should ideally be used up within 1 year for maximum effectiveness.

Give thanks for your yield- have an offering which may be a prayer, organic tobacco, or take the time to clean up the environment, pick up litter, help return mother nature to her optimal state.  I am a big advocate for researching what plant species may be endangered which naturally grow in a location and obtaining some organic seeds and replanting. We can all play a role in completing the circle for sustainability and ensuring that the plants are available to us for medicine in the future.

 

Enhance your Food with Herbal Powders

Discover the nutritional and healing benefits of herbs into your diet with herbal powders – finely milled plant material such as leaves, bark, flowers and berries. Learn how to incorporate them into daily meals for your family with delicious recipes! Katolen Yardley, MNIMH, RH (AHG) will discuss the benefits of various herbal powders and where you can purchase them. Together we’ll create and sample Herbal Energy Power Balls, Herbal Immune Enhancing Hummus, and Delicious Herbal Fudge Dessert.

Start date: Saturday, April 21 2018.

Schedule: On Saturday, April 21, 2018 from 1:30 PM to 4:00 PM VanDusen Guides Classroom

Cost: $ 40 ~ Click here to register:

Location: VanDusen  Botanical Gardens Classroom | 5251 Oak St, Vancouver, BC, V6M 4H1

Herbal Medicine Throughout History – Evening Talk

Join Medical Herbalist, Katolen Yardley, MNIMH, RH (AHG) on a journey through time looking at some unique approaches to herbal medicine including key herbalists worldwide and periods within herbal medicine history. Trace the use of herbal medicines throughout history and different cultures during this evening of storytelling and folklore. Katolen will discuss influental herbalists such as Hildegard, Galen and Hippocrates, and will focus on some important plants and their uses from traditional, to current scientific studies. Leave with a greater understanding of how plants play an important role in our society and health.

Start date: Thursday, May 24 2018.

On Thursday, May 24, 2018 from 7:00 PM to 9:00 PM

Location: VanDusen Botanical Gardens | 5251 Oak St, Vancouver, BC, V6M 4H1

COst $ 35 ~ To register click here:

Herbal Medicine for Womens Health- Evening Intro Talk

Join Medical Herbalist, Katolen Yardley, MNIMH, RH (AHG) for this introduction evening on to some unique herbs used specifically for women’s health. We will cover common herbs used for reproductive wellness through all phases of a women’s life. We will discuss medicinal properties and administration routes of these plants, as well as some recent scientific studies, while we sample some herbal products.

Start date: Thursday, May 17 2018.

On Thursday, May 17, 2018 from 7:00 PM to 9:00 PM

Location: VanDusen Guides Botanical Gardens | 5251 Oak St, Vancouver, BC, V6M 4H1

Cost: $ 35 ~ To register: click here!

The Art of Herbal Medicine Making [SOLD OUT]

Ready to take your interest in herbal medicine to the next level and learn how to make your own remedies? Dive into the art of herbal medicine making and learn how to prepare herbal teas, herbal vinegars, a medicinal salve and infused oil in this informative, hands-on workshop with instructor and Medical Herbalist – Katolen Yardley, MNIMH, RH (AHG). An instruction booklet will be provided. Learn the medicinal applications of herbs used in class for first aid.

Participants will:
Learn how to prepare and sample a herbal tea infusion and understand the difference between an infusion and decoction
Learn how to prepare an infused oil and the various applications for an oil
Observe the preparation of a herbal salve and take home a small container of medicinal salve
Prepare and take home 250 ml of medicinal and culinary herbal vinegar
Participants should bring one clean, wide-mouthed glass container (approx 250-300 mL) with tightly fitting lid, a pen, and a mug for sampling tea. Copies of instructor Katolen Yardley’s book, “Good Living Guide to Natural and Herbal Remedies”, will also be available for purchase for $25.
About the Instructor

Katolen Yardley, MNIMH, RH (AHG) is a medical herbalist and nature knower with over 20 years of clinical and herbal medicine making experience in private practice in Vancouver, BC. She enjoys providing people with tools for optimal health through inspiration and education. She is the author of the “Good Living Guide to Natural and Herbal Remedies” (August 2016) and current president of the Canadian Herbalist’s Association of British Columbia. She is a clinic supervisor at Dominion Herbal College and adjunct faculty at Boucher Naturopathic College and offers seminars to the general public. Visit www.katolenyardley.com for more information.

Location
UBC Farm | 3461 Ross Drive

Date and Time
Saturday, March 3 | 10:00 am – 1:00 pm (3 hours)

Cost
$69 ($59 for registered students – valid student ID is required) + GST

Click here to register for this workshop.

Centre for Sustainable Food Systems at UBC Farm
Faculty of Land and Food Systems
Vancouver Campus
3461 Ross Drive
Tel 604 822 5092
Fax 604 822 6839
Email farm.team@ubc.ca

Learning the Basics of Herbal Medicine

Want to learn more about herbal medicine, but not sure where to start? Join us for an experiential and informative talk on incorporating herbal medicine into your lifestyle. This talk offers gems for new and seasoned herbalists alike! We will discuss some back-to-nature home remedies and effective herbal medicines (including kitchen vegetables, spices, well known herbal medicines and wild plants) for common family health issues and ways of using herbal medicines in your home for routine first aid, topical applications, and medicinal uses. There will be an opportunity to ‘sample the flavours’ of some gentle herbs during this talk (so bring a spoon and a drinking mug!). Copies of Katolen Yardley’s book, “Good Living Guide to Natural and Herbal Remedies”, will also be available for purchase for $25.

About the Instructor

Katolen Yardley, MNIMH, RH (AHG) is a medical herbalist and nature knower with over 20 years of clinical and herbal medicine making experience in private practice in Vancouver, BC. She enjoys providing people with tools for optimal health through inspiration and education. She is the author of the “Good Living Guide to Natural and Herbal Remedies” (August 2016) and current president of the Canadian Herbalist’s Association of British Columbia. She is a clinic supervisor at Dominion Herbal College and adjunct faculty at Boucher Naturopathic College and offers seminars to the general public. Visit www.katolenyardley.com for more information.

Location
UBC Farm | 3461 Ross Drive

Date and Time
Wednesday, February 21| 6:30 – 8 pm (1.5 hours)

Cost
$29 ($25 for registered students – valid student ID is required) + GST

Click here to register for this workshop.

Centre for Sustainable Food Systems at UBC Farm
Faculty of Land and Food Systems
Vancouver Campus
3461 Ross Drive
Tel 604 822 5092
Fax 604 822 6839
Email farm.team@ubc.ca

Natural Cosmetic Making using Herbal Medicine

Interested in creating natural and clean body care products for you and your family? Join Katolen Yardley, MNIMH, RH (AHG) – Medical Herbalist for this informative workshop! Learn about herbs for skin care and create chemical free recipes the whole family will enjoy. During this workshop you will create and take home:

An herbal facial steam
A rich natural calendula cream 50 gr
A facial scrub 50 gr
A luscious massage oil 50 ml
Alchemy & Elixir Health Group Office: 604-683-2298
Cost: $65 plus GST
Date: Saturday October 28, 2017
Time: 9am – 12 pm
Email: info@ alchemyelixir.com
RSVP and prepayment to assure your spot as space is limited!
FB: Katolen Yardley, Medical Herbalist
www.katolenyardley.com
Location: Downtown Vancouver, BC
Details provided upon registration

Registrants can purchase a copy of Katolen’s book “The Good Living Guide to Natural and Herbal Remedies”

Herbal Bitters & Digestives: Herbal Medicine Making for Digestion

Herbal Bitters and Digestives: Herbal Medicine Making for Digestion

Date: Thursday, November 9, 2017   Time: 7 pm – 9 pm

Cost: $ 50 plus GST

Join Medical Herbalist, Katolen Yardley, MNIMH, RH (AHG) for a morning of herbal medicine making.
Discuss the importance of carminative herbs for optimal digestion.
Sample a digestive tea.
We will cover how bitters work and why they are important for whole body and digestive health.
Learn how to create your own Herbal Bitter Blendand take home 50 grams of Digestive Tea for future use.

Registrants can purchase a copy of Katolen’s book “The Good Living Guide to Natural and Herbal Remedies”
Pre registration and prepayment to reserve your space
Location: Downtown Vancouver BC
More information provided upon registration.
To register contact: info@alchemyelixir.com ph: 604 683 2298

 

Natural Cosmetic Making using Herbal Medicine

Interested in creating natural and clean body care products for you and your family?  Join Katolen Yardley, MNIMH, RH (AHG) – Medical Herbalist for this informative workshop! Learn about herbs for skin care and create chemical free recipes the whole family will enjoy. During this workshop you will create and take home:   

  • An herbal facial steam
  • A rich natural calendula cream 50 gr
  • A facial scrub 50 gr
  • A luscious massage oil 50 ml

Alchemy & Elixir Health Group Office: 604-683-2298
Cost: $65 plus GST
Date: Saturday Sept 23, 2017
Time: 9am – 12 pm
Email: info@ alchemyelixir.com
RSVP and prepayment to assure your spot as space is limited!
FB: Katolen Yardley, Medical Herbalist
www.katolenyardley.com
Location: Downtown Vancouver, BC
Details  provided upon registration

Registrants can purchase a copy of Katolen’s book “The Good Living Guide to Natural and Herbal Remedies”

 

Reflections on the NorthWest Herb Symposium: Botanicals at the Beach

With the goal of contributing in a small way to building a growing community, I am writing about my recent herbal medicine infused experience at Botanicals at the Beach: The Northwest Herb Symposium.

   

Being fond of travel (both local and afar) and having a sweet spot for local herbal gatherings (conferences leave me feeling inspired), I must say that the NW herb Symposium is one of my favorites. Situated in the San Juan Islands, Whidbey Island offers a scenic drive and picturesque site for herbal medicine infusion and education. I have so many amazing photos of this event- that I am excited to share my visuals and experiences. This herbal medicine conference is August 23-26, 2018 and is only a 3 hour drive from Vancouver.

 

      

Previously known as Fort Casey, the site of the conference was a previous army barracks; however recently turned children’s camp, with dormitories and tent camping available; situated on the edge of the ocean with stunning sunsets, cliffs and rugged skylines. The land still has the original army barracks and original majestic character of colonial houses complete with original moldings and claw foot tubs.

   

Some historical commentary apparently the US army opened Fort Casey (as it was called back then) back in the early 20 century to guard the entrance to Puget Sound. In its time Fort Casey was the fourth largest military posts in Washington. Today, Camp Casey and its grounds provide an opportunity to relax, reflect, appreciate nature and learn in a serene retreat environment.

   

The historic lighthouse is a short walk away and the local herb walks found us meandering into the forest to learn some traditional application for these valuable Pacific Northwest trees and native medicinal plants.

   
Numerous varieties of seaweeds are in the sound for viewing in Ryan Drums famous seaweed walks create a peace filled learning opportunity. The talks are held in line with the pull of the moon- so when the tide is out- either an early morning – or if we are lucky a mid day event. Morning yoga, organic herbal teas, exhibitors and vendor tables, sublime teas from B. Fullers Mortar & Pestle tea company in Seattle, local sponsors and evening movies round out this weekend event.

   

Perhaps one of the best things about this weekend is the intimate learning environment so close to nature, where the ratio of students to teachers is perfect for facilitating good conversation and mingling with everyone, instilling a “like family” environment. Having been here 2 years in a row, there are now familiar faces of those who have attended previous years events. The care and detail focused organisers of Botanicals on the Beach (Jay and Bridget, Rose and Nancy and likely others) offer a well organised event intended to give back to the herbal medicine community and in their 5 years of existence (3 years of conferences) have sponsored many of the best herbal medicine educators for their presentations.

   

The first year I attended the gathering there was Leslie and Michael Tierra, Jillian Stansbury, Amanda McQuade Crawford. Local San Juan Island herbal experts like Ryan Drum, PhD in Botany, Denise Joy (fourth generation herbalist), Leslie Lekos and Natasha Clarke brought their knowledge of local plants and Netta Deberoff, a fifth generation Doukhobor herbalist, shared her knowledge of creating an herbal hot pot and Eaglesong Gardener brought to life her personal stories of Hawthorn and I will forever more hear the words to the song “Row Your Boat” with new meaning! This year Susan Weed brought her wise woman wisdom to the conference and David Hoffman, BSc, FNIMH, RH (AHG) shared his thoughts on the future of holistic herbal medicine. Kevin Spelman, PhD, RH (AHG) another notable speaker bringing his expertise and research on mitochondria and cellular function to the discussions –ALL of the talks have been super informative, well researched, fun and packed full of learning.

      

Botanicals on the Beach also addresses environmental issues relevant to our health; last year’s key note speaker, Joseph Pizzorno shared research from his newly published book “THE TOXIN SOLUTION”: (How Hidden Poisons in the Air, Water, Food, and Products We Use Are Destroying Our Health). As if the title is not explanatory enough, he spoke about environmental toxicity and the impact of xenoestrogens on our endocrine health and organ function and how to improve this issue. Kevin Spelman brought in additional research about environmental toxicity, metabolic syndrome and the role of mitochondria functioning for healthy DNA replication and function. This year I had the pleasure of offering a talk of Phase 1 and 2 liver function, why a healthy liver is essential for the health of our whole body and our immune system and offered suggestions and research on various foods, herbs and mushrooms being studies to support liver detox. I also had the pleasure of sharing some of my clinical experience with herbal medicine and dermatitis; offering some recipes from my recently released book “The Good Living Guide to Natural and Herbal Medicine” and some insights and historical antidotes from the past about skin health.

   

For those interested wanting to expedite learning on health, healing and herbal medicine in a nature rich setting – check out this event. Save the date and website and be informed via email when the registration opens for 2018. Bring your friends; there is more than enough room for everyone.

   

The gathering is relatively new in its inception – which means that it requires the growth and continual support of the herbal community and sharing via social media in order to thrive and continue to offer such great speakers in an intimate setting- please share this post with other herbal enthusiasts who would be interested in a stimulating weekend. There are topics and experiences here for all levels of herbal medicine experience: from general interest and medicine making to practitioner track level presentations and embrace the opportunity to sit and chat with teachers over dinner after a talk. Save the dates for next year’s North West Herb Symposium conference (August 23-26, 2018) and circulate this valuable opportunity with your herbal community.

   

And if you thought this Whidbey Island NW Herb Conference post was just about an herb symposium, it was actually herbally infused with many adventures…prior to my arrival at Camp Casey, I visited some of the local herbal sites found around the island. Click here to view my other adventures: The Lavender Wind Farm and the Earth Sanctuary nature reserve.