Category Archives: Philosophy of Health

Considerations for Wildcrafing Herbal Medicines

Written by Katolen Yardley, MNIMH, RH (AHG)

Wild harvesting and a return to “foraging skills” has become very popular in recent times- essential it is recognizing the bounty of plants that mother earth provides. On one hand, it is fabulous that more people are learning skills in plant recognition and able to harvest the medicine they need, when they need it – plant medicine is essentially medicine for the people; supplied by mother earth.

      

Wild crafting is very cost effective (there is no markup on the product) and one has complete control over the quality of the medicine; knowing about all processes from start to finish. Perhaps wild crafting can raise awareness of the importance of caring for the earth – it is an ideal practice for those who have an interest in “getting back to the land”; If one spends time in nature, and harvests her yields, individuals may be more likely to care for the earth, recognizing that what we do to the earth, we do to ourselves. Pollution, clear cutting and the use of pesticides all impact the quality of our food and affect our health. Many people are disconnected from their food source and medicines;  we cannot  have high quality food if the soil the food is grown on is contaminated.

   

Here are some important considerations if one wants to begin wild crafting – many of which should be thought through prior to visiting the land and gathering the plants.

Wild crafting can be defined as a return to mother nature to gather the plant medicine which she herself provides. Plants should be harvested with care for the plant and concern the environment (plant sustainability, the ecosystem around and quality of the soil). Wild crafters return to the land to harvest their herbs, barks and roots- walking through undisturbed forests, meadows or hills. Ethical wild crafting is now an important consideration which ensures care for the environment, all of its inhabitants and the future supply of a plant.

     

Plants should always be harvested away from pollutants including: toxic rain pollution and soil which has been contaminated with pesticides or herbicides and ground run off . Take time to consider what is “up the hill from a harvest” as animal waste, toxic runoff flows down a hill to setting in and contaminate soil away from the original site of contamination.

Investigate the history of the land. Old train tracks, mining sites and garbage dumping sites are often the sites of soil contamination even decades after visible contamination has been removed. Harvests should be far from car fumes (carbon monoxide), gas fumes as well as animal waste. Do not harvest from designated parkland or private property.

Whenever possible read up and educate oneself about how to harvest a plant part without killing the plant. Sometimes this is not possible – as in the case of wild cherry bark for example – harvesting a lot of the bark can kill the entire tree. So instead consider venturing out after a wind storm and select the boughs that mother nature has herself discarded for your harvest.

If you are harvesting the aerial plant parts, Do not pull this plant out from its roots  instead have proper equipment, pruning shears to neatly clip some aerial parts-remember to leave enough of any one plant for it to go to seed or continuing sprouting through the growing season or the next year.

    

Do not take the first or the last plant – never ever overharvest. Plants need to be able to go to seed and also sustain other life of animals grazing on local nutritive plants for food. Pay attention to what is around the plant. Are bees flocking to this plant to assist with pollination? Many edible plants are also food for bears or deer. Some species grow on other plants – and disturbing their ecosystem may kill more than 1 plant.

Take only what you need– any typically this is far less than what our mind thinks.

Do no harm. Be aware of the environment one is harvesting from- the plant you are using for medicine has a home and is a part of other plant communities; animals and insects may depend on this plant for survival, nutrient uptake, and essential symbiotic relationships. Recognise that you are disturbing this delicate ecosystem. Take only what you need -less than 10 % of a plant grove, preferably in the middle of the grove; so not the first plant you find and certainly not the last one in the grove and leave NO TRACE that you were ever there.

Proper plant identification is essential- especially for some of those plant families containing toxic look alikes which are easily confused with a benign non toxic plant. Have 2-3 excellent plant identification references- preferable with photos to ensure that no mistaken identities occur. Become familiar with local green medicines (often common weeds)- they are numerous!

Do not harvest endangered or at risk herbs from nature, instead take the time and attempt to grow your own herbs- Growing plants on your own land- get creative- (a window sill or even community garden will suffice) and will  raise your respect for the delicate plants which are fighting in nature to survive both the elements of nature and enthusiastic harvesters. Some plants take 10-12 years to regrow – this is not sustainable. Chaga for example is a very popular medicinal mushroom which selectively grows on birch trees, it takes years to grow and harvesting the mushroom can often kill the tree it is grown on. Again not ideal – this is an example of an herb/ mushroom which is best purchased from a supplier who grown the mushrooms in grow labs.

    

Quality and processing of herbs: have the herb leaves been munched by other plant enthusiasts – insects? Is the plant part to use too young to harvest- in which leave it in the ground for another season. Young stalks, fresh vibrant green leaves contain the most vital medicine. Ensure you use the seasons to determine when to harvest certain plant parts. Roots, rhizomes are best harvested when the vital force is highest in the root – the fall and winter is this time. Leaves and aerial plant parts can be harvested through the spring and summer- however older or brown leaves are not vibrant. Is the herb too old?  – then leave it as an elder in the plant grove.

Gathering the plants is one consideration however processing and drying procedures are also a consideration. Many plants oxidize poorly when drying, and prefer to have lots of room to dry without coming into contact with other plant leaves. Other herbs stalks can be bound together and hung in a drying room with good air circulation. A dehydrator or drying rack can assist. Color should be vibrant, with a characteristic scent of the plant. Store plants in glass container and dried herbs should ideally be used up within 1 year for maximum effectiveness.

Give thanks for your yield- have an offering which may be a prayer, organic tobacco, or take the time to clean up the environment, pick up litter, help return mother nature to her optimal state.  I am a big advocate for researching what plant species may be endangered which naturally grow in a location and obtaining some organic seeds and replanting. We can all play a role in completing the circle for sustainability and ensuring that the plants are available to us for medicine in the future.

 

Enhance your Food with Herbal Powders

Discover the nutritional and healing benefits of herbs into your diet with herbal powders – finely milled plant material such as leaves, bark, flowers and berries. Learn how to incorporate them into daily meals for your family with delicious recipes! Katolen Yardley, MNIMH, RH (AHG) will discuss the benefits of various herbal powders and where you can purchase them. Together we’ll create and sample Herbal Energy Power Balls, Herbal Immune Enhancing Hummus, and Delicious Herbal Fudge Dessert.

Start date: Saturday, April 21 2018.

Schedule: On Saturday, April 21, 2018 from 1:30 PM to 4:00 PM VanDusen Guides Classroom

Cost: $ 40 ~ Click here to register:

Location: VanDusen  Botanical Gardens Classroom | 5251 Oak St, Vancouver, BC, V6M 4H1

Herbal Medicine Throughout History – Evening Talk

Join Medical Herbalist, Katolen Yardley, MNIMH, RH (AHG) on a journey through time looking at some unique approaches to herbal medicine including key herbalists worldwide and periods within herbal medicine history. Trace the use of herbal medicines throughout history and different cultures during this evening of storytelling and folklore. Katolen will discuss influental herbalists such as Hildegard, Galen and Hippocrates, and will focus on some important plants and their uses from traditional, to current scientific studies. Leave with a greater understanding of how plants play an important role in our society and health.

Start date: Thursday, May 24 2018.

On Thursday, May 24, 2018 from 7:00 PM to 9:00 PM

Location: VanDusen Botanical Gardens | 5251 Oak St, Vancouver, BC, V6M 4H1

COst $ 35 ~ To register click here:

Herbal Medicine for Digestion

This informative talk  offered by Medical Herbalist, Katolen Yardley, MNIMH, RH (AHG) will cover information on herbal medicines for digestive health and will discuss how certain herbal medicines can assist digestion through various actions. Explore the benefits of some common spices and carminative (reduces bloating) rich herbs, and learn the effects of bitter and demulcent (anti-inflammatory) herbs.

Participants will sample a digestive tea and demulcent mixture and will take home a small bag of a carminative digestive spice blend.

Start date: Wednesday, March 28 2018.

Time:  7:00 PM to 9:00 PM

Location: VanDusen Botanical Gardens | 5251 Oak St, Vancouver, BC, V6M 4H1

Cost $ 35  Click here: To register:

The Earth Sanctuary on Whidbey Island

This year, I visited the Earth Sanctuary, retreat center, sacred ground and a not-for-profit nature reserve. Situated a mile outside of Freeland  and before Langley, on the south end of Whidbey Island.

   

Wooden benches situated at the sides of the pond invited contemplation and a reflective moment while watching the mist rising from the still water. Bird calls and sounds of flapping wings filled my ears. It is evident that this is was a refuge and habit for local wildlife. The intentional art and sculptures were discovered around turns of the path and  prayer wheels called me back in to meditation.

The meandering 2 miles of trails led me through an old growth forest and an arborerum;  a recent project and restoration site for many native plants. The arboretum intends a return to old growth forest by replanting a variety of native trees including Fir, Cedar, Birch, Spruce, Redwoods .

       

I am called down the labyrinth path and discover a natural a salal hedge labyrinth intended for contemplation in walking meditation, a metaphor for representing life’s journey.  The labrynth

Labyrinth by WellFedSpirit.org

has a single continuous path leading inward to the center – a metaphor for lifes journey, the only thing to do is travel forward, one step in front of the other, until reaching ones goal.  An arrival at the center occurs before  turning outwards again to complete the journey and attain the goal.  A walking meditation is both an inward and outward journey, there is the activation of the left and right brain through movement and stimulation of our bodies circulation and lymphatic systems; during the walking contemplation ones awareness moves inward to finally reach a calm center;  the core of our be-ing and connection with the inner realms of our mind and oneness in our body.  A labyrinth can represent a sort of pilgrimage for those who are unable to take a longer sacred journey or pilgrimage like the camino de santiago, vipassana meditation or  the kumbh mela. An interesting piece of trivia is that there are labyrinth patters found throughout the world in various cultures and also found in basket weaving designs, paintings, drawings and hedge borders.

Above is a visual of a labrinth by the website: http://wellfedspirit.org/labyrinth_pages/graphics.html

Down another path I discover the Fen Pond stone circles. I am reminded of the sacred stones in the popular television series Outlander, a ceremonial circle used for prayer, intention setting and giving thanks. Not much is known about stone circles today; however many have suggested that these circles are sacred sites intended for prayer with precise astrological alignment to the movements of the sun and moon, combined with sacred geometry.

Pairs of stones are aligned in true north and south, also to the winter solstice sunset and to the  run rising and setting in the summer; connecting one back to the 4 directions and grounding into the land, interweaving ritual back into daily life while connecting with the greater mystery.

A reminder of the interconnectness of all things; interweaving nature, the sun and skies and mother earth into all life. Stonehenge in Great Britain perhaps being one of the most well known sites. There is an informative website called The Stone Circle Theory by Simon Hedger who offers additional reflections. For more information: http://www.stonecircletheory.com/

Further on the path a meadow opens up into the Cottonwood Stone Circle and I marvel at the  12 majestic stones towering 11 feet high.

The grounds have been a home to Ospreys with educational artwork found along the path. Ospreys are able to breed on almost every continent except near the South Pole. Apparently Ospreys can live for 10-12 years, however these birds were once on the endangered list (although now listed as a threatened species) – according to the New York Department of Conservation, largely their population had decreased due to the insecticide Dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane, DDT – more commonly known — which caused reproductive issues and thinning of egg shells  in the newly laid eggs. DDT is classified in a group of chemicals called Persistent Organic Pollutants aka chemical substances that stay in our soil and  the environment, bio-accumulate through the entire food chain,  posing health risks to humans and animals in our food chain and the all of the natural world. Used previously in agriculture, DDT has now been banned from agricultural use in the United States, as it has shown to impact human health including being linked to infertility, breast cancer and other endocrine health issues. Take note, this insecticide has a half life of 25-30 years – meaning once DDT is in the soil it stays there for a very long time.

By no means am I am expert on the history of Buddhist monuments however I immediately recognized and appreciated their presence, Having once been gifted a prayer wheel myself – I will share my limited knowledge of the Tibetan prayer wheel  or Mani wheel found along a bend in the path… A Prayer Wheel provides an opportunity to spread spiritual well-being and blessings while spinning the wheel. Spinning the prayer wheel is done with the proper intentions. Holding elevated intentions for the well-being, spiritual blessings and highest outcome of all beings is essential while using the prayer wheel; incorporating visualizations and mantra will align one with the Body, Speech and Mind of the Buddha.

Set your intention setting while spinning a prayer wheel.  Intend on strengthening the mind and contemplate offerings such as :

  • “May all beings be happy. May all beings be free from suffering.”
  • Reciting a prayer or a mantra can also be done while spinning the wheel to align ones spirit with the on loving kindness and equanimity for all sentient beings.
  • Om Mani Padme Hung, the  mantra of loving kindness and compassion is often written on the outside of the wheel in Sanskrit.

A stupa is situated on a hill – a sacred mound intended for enlightenment and created for various purposes (from a burial ground to marking an profound event or created as a receptacle for offerings). A clockwise walking meditation around the stupa is done in reverence or reflection to radiate spiritual blessings and for specific meditation practices. Prayer flags are found around the paths.

Also on the nature reserve was a tall dolmen -a megalithic tomb of two or more, upright stones set with a space between and set with a horizontal stone on top, which could serve as a meditation room  or in the Hindu tradition represents “the cave of the heart”, a protected place for reflection.

       

The most sacred space for me was the First Nations Medicine Wheel used for prayer and healing. The significance of  this prayer wheel reminds one again of connection to all that is, all our relations, the 4 directions, the 4 seasons, mother earth, our grandfathers and grandmothers, and the elements. So much can be remembered through strengthening connection to all that sustains us on planet earth.

What a serene way to enjoy the afternoon in this birth and wildlife sanctuary. In 2008, the visionary and designer and founder of Earth Sanctuary, Chuck Pettis, was recognized in the September 2008 issue of Science of Mind magazine as one of 12 people making a difference in the world. If you are on Whidbey island, this space is worth a stop.

Much of the restoration is being done by the University of Washington ecology students to complete projects in this remarkable site. A huge thank you to all those who have contributed to such a stunning serene location. Until I return again…

Hydrosols & Aromatic Waters

Written by Katolen Yardley, MNIMH, RH (AHG)

Stove Top Distillation Method for Floral Waters

Hydrosols aka, aromatic waters and floral waters are an enchanting way of making rose water, orange water and other aromatic waters prepared from fresh or dried plant material, vegetables, barks or roots.
For the easy kitchen preparation all you need is some simple kitchen ingredients.

~ Materials ~
• Large pot with a lid, a pot for canning works great
• Large lid for pot – clear and curved is ideal (so you can see the accumulation of aromatic water in your inside container)
• Small bowl or pyrex glass container to sit inside your pot to collect the hydrosol.
• Something heat-proof to stand the smaller container on inside the large pot, a jar rack works     perfectly for this. A heat-proof ramekin, flat rock or steamer, with legs, with the center removed will also work.
• Water: high quality distilled or filtered
• Zip lock bag to store the melting ice
• Lots of ice cubes (consider even freezing ice in a 250 ml or 500 ml yoghurt container or another large vessel)
• Plant material (fresh or dried) chopped finely
• A heat source: fire, hot plate, electric stove, gas or butane camping stove
• Bottles or a mister spray bottle for storing your hydrosol
• Labels
• Have a dedicated notebook close by for recording your experience and findings

~ Method ~
Place the rack or ramekin in the bottom of the large pot and put the small collecting bowl or container on top of the ramekin. Next fill the bottom of the large pot with plant material. You want the plants to reach up to the smaller bowl. If you would like to record your amount- take the herbs out and weigh them – before returning them to the pot. Then fill with water until the plant material is submersed. Finally put your lid upside down on top of the large pot. Bring the water to a simmer over medium heat. After it starts to simmer, put the bag of ice on the inverted lid. Replace ice as needed. A clear lid will allow for you to watch the hydrosol condense! Heat up enough for the water surrounding the plant material to steam but not boil, or bring up to a boiling point and reduce to a low simmer. Let the distillation work its magic for about 30 minutes or so.
~ How It Works ~
The water will steam the plant material carrying the aromatic essence from the plant into the air. The steam collects on the lid of the pan and condenses due to the ice cubes. Because the pot lid is upside down, as the steam turns back into a liquid the liquid is directed to drip down into the smaller bowl. This liquid is your hydrosol (aka floral water)! Note that the plant material inside the alembic will be dry, brittle and noticeably void of any color or life force remaining. It has been said that the life force of the plant or vital chi energy, is carried over into the new creation. Store you hydrosol in a dark glass bottle in the refrigerator. Hydrosols are intended for immediate use and have a shelf life of a  one to couple months to a little longer depending upon storage. Use your hydrosols often and enjoy!
Creative Hydrosol Application
Some of my favorite hydrosol preparations are ones prepared from common flowers and fruits. Fresh or dried chamomile, rose petals, lavender, fireweed, cucumber, orange and lemon and some of my fond favorites.

Applications are as varied as your creativity. Aromatic waters have a relatively short shelf life so they are best used daily. Consider using hydrosols for:

  • Skin Care: for skin conditions from acne to diaper rash to oily or dry, mature
    skin. Place  into a spritzer container and use on the skin.
  • Add into creams, use as a skin toner or for wound care, sunburn, rashes or
    poison ivy.
  • Prepare a compress for sore muscles, rashes, bites even hot flushes.
    Add into a bath, foot soak, hair rinse, mouthwash or a neti pot.
  • Use as a humidifier or room atomizer to elevate the energy in a room and uplift emotions.
  • Consider adding into culinary recipes or medicine making; replace the water in your recipe with hydrosol!
  • Home cleaning: car cleaning, yoga mats, massage tables cleaning, ironing, laundry in the dryer.
  • Pet care: hot spots, for washing infected ears, for rinsing fur or dirty faces
  • Digestion support or finger bowls.

The Alchemy of Hydrosols

How to Prepare Floral Waters, or in ancient terms: Preparing Hydrosols using Alembics
Katolen Yardley, MNIMH, RH (AHG)
Copyright 2017
www.katolenyardley.com

The art of distillation dates back past 5000 BC. Herbal waters or hydrosols even predate
the preparation of essential oils by hundreds of years. If you are interested in creating
floral waters, aka, hydrosols, then learn the basics of plant distillation. Becoming familiar with the words used in the process and the rituals associated with historical use immediately aligns us with historic practices and the magic of transformation itself. When creating hydrosols, know that you are tapping into ancient wisdom and transformative alchemical processes.

Deciphering Terms:

  • Floral water creates a useful visual but is not the most accurate representation, as hydrosols can be steam distilled from other plant parts, barks, seeds, fruits, roots as well as flowers, vegetables, even beeswax.
  • Aromatic water or plant water are descriptive terms – painting the picture of an ‘aroma filled’ water; however water from plants do not always bringing forth the familiar characteristic scent of the plant, but take on there is a fingerprint of the plants’ essence.
  • Hydrosol The term hydrosol was first recorded around 1860, the term comes from the Latin hydro, meaning ‘water’ and sol, which means ‘solution.’ ‘Hydrosol’ indicates any water-based solution or distillate waters.
  • Hydrolate or hydrolat may be the most accurate words to use. Sourced from the Greek word ‘hydor’, and Latin word ‘hydro’, means ‘water,’ and lait, meaning ‘milk’ referring to how the liquid appears when it comes off the still.

Distillation The process of purifying a liquid by volatilization or evaporation and subsequent condensation of a liquid, as when water is boiled in a retort and the steam is condensed in a cool receiver. (Dictionary.com) The process of heating a liquid until it gives off a gas and then cooling the gas until it again becomes liquid (Mirriam Webster Dictionary Online). The word ‘distillation’ comes from the Latin word ‘destillare’ meaning ‘to trickle down drop by drop.’

An alembic is an apparatus or piece of equipment used in distillation, an agent something that refines or transmutes as if by distillation.  There are many types of Alembics, also known as distillation units or stills which can vary in design, purpose and materials used. There are clay pottery alembics, stills made from  brass, iron, copper and stainless steel. If you are using equipment for medicine making ensure you choose food grade equipment.

How Hydrosols are Created
Hydrosols are created from the steam distillation of plant matter which produces both essential oils and a water component (hydrosol). Steam distillation can occur in a large, tall pot (alembic), containing plant matter and water. As the pot is heated the water will break through the plant material and loosen the volatile constituents. Steam, intermingled with the aromatic essence of the plant material, will rise to the top of the alembic. A tightly fitting lid, with a secure seal ensures that no steam will leak out of the vessel and instead allows for the steam to rise to the top of the alembic. As the steam cools it transforms into liquid which is collected at the top of the lid and as the steam cools it transforms back into aromatic water, seeping down the sides, into the spout and  and into the collecting bowl container.

For kitchen preparations- the steam collects on the lid of the pan and condenses due to the ice cubes (the ice cools down the steam), turning the steam back into water (hydrolat), with small amounts of oil (essential oil). Because the pot lid is upside down, as the steam turns back into a liquid, the liquid drips down into the smaller collecting bowl. Small amount of essential oil also transfer into the hydrosol. Aromatic waters and essential oil do not mix, so any the essential oil, may be seen on the top of the water where it can be siphoned off or mixed into the final product. As hydrosols are a water-based product; pay close attention in both the distillation and preservation processes to preventing bacterial contamination. First and foremost is the cleanliness of the still, tubing, high quality water, collecting vessels, and work surfaces used in the distilling process. For more information on kitchen preparations of hydrosols, continue reading.

Herbal Medicine Making for Athletes & Arthritis First Aid


Join Medical Herbalist, Katolen Yardley, MNIMH for a morning of herbal medicine making. Create your own first aid products for sprains, strains and bruises, athletic recovery and arthritis.
We will make:

  • A Topical Anti inflammatory Cooling Liniment
  • A Turmeric, Cayenne Pain Relief Salve and an
  • Arnica Comfrey Healing Lotion.
  • Learn how to prepare a poultice and fomentation while you
  • Sample an anti inflammatory herbal tea in class.

Date: Saturday, March 11, 2017
Time: 9am – 12pm
Cost: $ 70 plus GST
Pre registration and prepayment required to reserve your space
Location: South Granville, Vancouver BC
More information provided upon registration.
To register email: info@alchemyelixir.com  or ph: 604 683 2298

 

The Good Living Guide to Natural and Herbal Remedies

I am very excited to announce the release of my new book “The Good Living Guide to Natural and Herbal Remedies.” Inspired by the urgent need to recognize the value of mother earth and the gifts which she provides, especially plants – both serving as our foods and also our medicines and the importance of taking steps to maintain and preserve the health of the earth for our own wellbeing, the continued accessibility of our healing plants and the health of generations in the future.front cover small

This back-to-nature home remedy and herbal medicine making guide provides details on effective herbal medicines (kitchen vegetables, spices, well known herbal medicines and wild plants) for common family health issues. Inside the 310 pages of this hardcover book you will find recipes for various common health concerns: from an upset stomach, indigestion to arthritis and sore muscles, wound healing to acne, eczema, hives as well as body care recipes (body washes, insect repellents, cleansers and hair masks).

Regardless of if you are a beginner or advanced in your herbal training – this book is for you!  Providing guidance for preparing infusions, decoctions, medicinal honeys, general tincture preparation, herbal vinegars and topical applications as well as general first aid guidance using herbal medicine. There are also tasty food recipes which incorporate edible plants into ones diet.

Color photographs offer assistance with plant identification, this is a reference manual; offering tips for both beginners as well as recipes and traditional and modern applications for advanced herbal practitioners.

Kat book 2Featuring a long list of medicinal plants including detailed descriptions on the use of Turmeric, Lavender, Nettles, Heartsease, Sweet Violet, Self Heal, Juniper and Sage; common kitchen herbs and even vegetables and also some lesser known medicinal plants such as Watercress, Daisy and Sunflowers!

We all know that what we put on our skin is absorbed into out body. There is more and more research conducted on groups of commercial synthetic chemicals (largely found in cosmetic use and cleaning supplies) known as Xenoestrogens – also known as Endocrine disruptors (known to increase our bodies estrogen levels, and contribute to health conditions including infertility, polycystic ovarian syndrome, lowered sperm counts and have the ability to disrupt thyroid function, and linked to obesity, and a large list of health issues).

The cosmetic and body care recipes inside this book are environmentally friendly and Xenoestrogen free – they can play a small role in reducing our exposure to toxic chemicals typically found in common packaged cosmetics and also reduce the impact of environmentally toxic chemicals in the environment, our water and food chain and on marine life.

Packed full of herbal wisdom, traditional use and just the right amount of science, readers will gain confidence in plant identification as they dive into the art of creating ones own elixirs at home. In short, “The Good Living Guide to Natural and Herbal Remedies” is a simple, straightforward, and beautiful guide to herbal remedies that will help you take charge of your health using nature’s own medicine.

kat book 3There is some urgency in remembering and recognizing the value of mother nature and the plants which she grows.  We reach for what is familiar! That which we use daily -those very habits which we see our family repeating daily, is what we will likely repeat as adults. Our habits today create the habits of the next generation- we need our future generations to remember the importance of clean soil, clean air and accessible plants, both as our foods and as our medicines. This book is a small tool for the remembering of the value of our plants and how to apply them as medicines for common first aid.

Some reviews of the book can be viewed here.

More about me:  You can view a more in depth bio here on my website www.katolenyardley.com: Katolen Yardley, MNIMH – I have been in private practice for almost 2 decades (not to date myself) specializing in women’s health, digestive and skin issues. I have taught herbal medicine making classes for over 25 years, and offer my wisdom and experience to a variety of students in workshops and classrooms.

Autographed copies can be purchased online from my website: www.alchemyelixir.com or books are also available for purchase online: at Amazon, Indigo Chapters, Barnes and Nobel, Banyen Books, and hopefully at a bookstore near you.

A Holistic Approach to Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (and associated mental health issues including Depression and Anxiety)

Join Katolen Yardley, MNIMH in this one-day workshop exploring the impact that long term stress has on the body. We will cover the HPA Axis, and some theories behind PTSD and related mental health issues (including anxiety and depression). Participants will investigate the connection between systemic inflammation and optimal digestive function and dis-ease, including the role a healthy microbiome plays in mental health. Additionally, participants will learn about holistic treatment protocols including nutrition and plant medicine in the route back to optimal health.

Therapeutic options covered include the following:

  • Herbal Medicine options
  • Tips for Nutrition and supplements
  • Lifestyle considerations
  • The role which ‘Connection’ has on our state of mind
  • This course is ideal for a health care professional or any person wanting holistic guidance for supporting their body through extended stress.

Course Instructor: Katolen Yardley is a Medical Herbalist and owner of Alchemy & Elixir Health Group – currently in private practice in Vancouver and Port Moody, BC. Katolen teaches herbal medicine courses at Boucher Institute of Naturopathic Medicine, Langara College, Dominion Herbal College and local and international conferences. She is vice president of the Canadian Council of Herbalist Associations (CCHA) and second term president of the Canadian Herbalist’s Association of BC (CHA of BC).

Since 1998, she has appeared on Global Television Morning News, where she offers herbal information to the public. Katolen has been a guest on the Discovery Channel’s Healthy Home Show and has been published in numerous magazines and health journals. Her personal interest in health lies with the emotional connection to wellness and dis-ease.

Her book The Good Living Guide to Natural and Herbal Remedies is available July 2016 and book signings will occur at the end of the course.

For more information visit: www.katolenyardley.com or                                                       Facebook: Katolen Yardley, Medical Herbalist
Date: Saturday, September 17, 2016, 9:00am-5:00pm                                                                             Location: Pacific Rim College, Victoria, BC
To register visit: Pacific Rim College Event
https://www.pacificrimcollege.com/workshops/workshop-registration-form/

Course Tuition
Regular – $150 (Early Bird – $142.50, until August 1)
Students* – $137.50 (Early Bird – $125, until August 1)
PRC Alumni – $142.50 (Early Bird – $132.50, until August 1)
*PRC diploma students will receive 0.5 NU/WHS academic credit for this workshop.